ADN Issue 7, June 2014

Contents

Automotive Software Complexity

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Dealing with automotive software complexity with virtual prototyping - Part 1: Virtual HIL development basics
Victor Reyes
Technical Marketing Manager, Synopsys Inc.
Embedded, May 24, 2014
Today’s luxury car now has upwards of one hundred million lines of code, more than a commercial airliner built for transcontinental travel, and this number is rising steadily with no upper limit in sight [1]. Today, this code is distributed across 50 to 100 Electronic Control Units (ECUs) governing thousands of singular functions. Hundreds of related functions are grouped on a single ECU.

Industry analysts calculate that at least 40% of a vehicle’s market value is linked to its software content and manufacturers report that software problems are now the source of a majority of customer complaints. An estimated 80% of automotive innovations are now computer-based, making software a major contributor to the price and value of a car. It’s not unusual for Tier 1 and OEMs in the automotive supply chain to employ several thousand software engineers to develop, integrate, and test software.

Tags: Embedded, Software, Automotive,
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Dealing with automotive software complexity with virtual prototyping - Part 2: An AUTOSAR use case
Victor Reyes
Technical Marketing Manager, Synopsys Inc.
Embedded, May 25, 2014
In 2003, OEM manufacturers and Tier 1 automotive suppliers founded the AUTOSAR3 consortium to address the technical and business challenges they all faced with the increase in software development and test costs. The premise of that conversation is the principle that guides the AUTOSAR alliance today: Cooperate on standards, compete on implementation. The net goal of the consortium is to drive the change in software development, moving from proprietary solutions to standardized, productized and predictable software products.

AUTOSAR focuses on three main areas: software architecture, methodology and application interfaces. In this document we will only discuss on the software architecture part.

Tags: Embedded, Software, Automotive,
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Dealing with automotive software complexity with virtual prototyping - Part 3: Embedded software testing
Victor Reyes
Technical Marketing Manager, Synopsys Inc.
Embedded, May 25, 2014
Code coverage measurement and fault injection testing are two very important activities to increase the quality of tests. However, the application of both activities during the embedded software integration and testing phases is typically very limited. On the one hand, code coverage is mainly applied to on-host software unit testing.

Although useful, on-host testing at the unit test level does not exercise big parts of the embedded software running on the device and therefore it is not sufficient to credibly guarantee that faulty software is not being deployed. On the other hand, conventional fault injection techniques that can be applied during software integration and test phases have multiple limitations in terms of intrusiveness and controllability and offer only a limited set of injection points that could help to reach a more extensive coverage.

Tags: Embedded, Software, Automotive,
Parlament, London

Parlament,
London, United Kingdom

ADN Editor in Chief
Dr Toomas P Plaks

London
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